DKIM

  • DNS

    ​Verifying your domain with a TXT record

    Before we start the topic of the TXT records, we are just going to scratch the surface of the DNS (Domain Name System). First, we will learn what DNS is, a DNS record, and the TXT record. That way, you can better understand the process of the verification of your domain.

    ​What is DNS?

    DNS is the universal translater that links domain names to their IP addresses. It is used on all websites and many services like, for example, web hosting and emails. You should know that DNS works with DNS records, which are instruction sets, linking various resources (names, IP addresses, services, etc.) together.

    ​What is a DNS record?

    A DNS record is a simple text file that DNS uses to add data. The data can be which domain has which IP address, which domain name has another canonical name, which server is located, and more.

    ​What is a TXT record?

    The TXT record is a type of DNS record that can verify your domain and various authentication processes. The most common ways that you can use TXT are:

    • Sender Policy Framework (SPF). It is a technology that can give you feedback about your emails. Basically, it shows who can send emails on behalf of the domain’s owner.
    • Domain Keys Identified Mail (DKIM). It is a method of encryption for your emails by linking the domain name and the emails. It is another anti-forging technology that improves the security of your emails.
    • Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance (DMARC). It combines the features of the previous two and provides a more complex reporting mechanism. For example, it can show if the email was sent from the right domain and, if not, what the receiver should do.
    • Verify your cloud account. Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and others will use TXT records with a particular string of information that they will want you to add to your DNS.

    ​Verifying your domain with a TXT record.

    If you are using a service that wants you to verify that you are the real owner of a domain, that is often performed by adding a TXT record to the domain host’s zone. A service like Google Workspace, Microsoft 365, and Google Console must first verify the owner before starting working.

    They will usually provide you a code, a string of random text, that they want you to put where your domain’s DNS records are located.

    If you are the owner of a domain, you would have access to your profile on your domain registrar’s site, where you bought a domain name. There you will need to create a TXT record. Depending on your provider, the type of record could be listed as TXT, DNS TXT, or TXT record.

    So go to the domain settings and search for DNS management (or similar, depending on your provider).

    Add a TXT record where the host will be your domain name, and the TXT value will be the code you previously copied.

    Save the new record.

    Now you need to wait until the propagation ends. Sometimes, changes can take up to 72 hours until your newly created record gets on all the DNS servers of the host.

    Done! You will be able to use the service already.

    ​Conclusion.

    Verifying your domain is a must when you want to use many services. The way to do it is simple, by adding a TXT record to your domain’s DNS zone.